5. A novel patient-centered “intention-to-treat” metric of U.S. lung transplant center performance

Amer. J. Transplant. 18, 1, 226–231, Jan 2018.

Dawn A. Maldonado1, Arindam RoyChoudhury2 and David J. Lederer1,3,* DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14486

Despite the importance of pretransplantation outcomes, 1-year posttransplantation survival is typically considered the primary metric of lung transplant center performance in the United States. We designed a novel lung transplant center performance metric that incorporates both pre- and posttransplantation survival time. We performed an ecologic study of 12 187 lung transplant candidates listed at 56 U.S. lung transplant centers between 2006 and 2012. We calculated an “intention-to-treat” survival (ITTS) metric as the percentage of waiting list candidates surviving at least 1 year after transplantation. The median center-level 1-year posttransplantation survival rate was 84.1%, and the median center-level ITTS was 66.9% (mean absolute difference 19.6%, 95% limits of agreement 4.3 to 35.1%). All but 10 centers had ITTS values that were significantly lower than 1-year posttransplantation survival rates. Observed ITTS was significantly lower than expected ITTS for 7 centers. These data show that one third of lung transplant candidates do not survive 1 year after transplantation, and that 12% of centers have lower than expected ITTS. An “intention-to-treat” survival metric may provide a more realistic expectation of patient outcomes at transplant centers and may be of value to transplant centers and policymakers.