Recipient-matching of Passenger Leukocytes Prolongs Survival of Donor Lung Allografts in Miniature Swine.

Maria Lucia L MadariagaSebastian G MichelGlenn M La Muraglia 2ndSmita SihagDavid A LeonardEvan A FarkashRobert B ColvinCurtis L Cetrulo JrChristene A HuangDavid H SachsJoren C MadsenJames S Allan Transplantation. 2015 Jul;99(7):1372-8. doi: 10.1097/TP.0000000000000676.
Full text at:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4494890/

Background: Allograft rejection continues to be a vexing problem in clinical lung transplantation, and the role played by passenger leukocytes in the rejection or acceptance of an organ is unclear. We tested whether recipient-matching of donor graft passenger leukocytes would impact graft survival in a preclinical model of orthotopic left lung transplantation.

Methods: In the experimental group (group 1), donor lungs were obtained from chimeric swine, in which the passenger leukocytes (but not the parenchyma) were major histocompatibility complex-matched to the recipients (n = 3). In the control group (group 2), both the donor parenchyma and the passenger leukocytes were major histocompatibility complex-mismatched to the recipients (n = 3).

Results: Lungs harvested from swine previously rendered chimeric by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using recipient-type cells showed a high degree of passenger leukocyte chimerism by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. The chimeric lungs containing passenger leukocytes matched to the lung recipient (group 1) survived on average 107 days (range, 80-156). Control lung allografts (group 2) survived on average 45 days (range, 29-64; P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Our data indicate that recipient-matching of passenger leukocytes significantly prolongs lung allograft survival.